2018 Cook County judicial voting guide: 10th subcircuit

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In the 10th subcircuit, which covers parts of far north and northwest Chicago and northwest suburban Cook County, eight candidates are vying for two judicial seats.

Once elected, there is no difference in responsibility of the countywide judges and subcircuit judges. All voters will have the chance to vote for all countywide candidates, but voters only vote for subcircuit candidates in their own area.

Not sure if you live in the 10th subcircuit? Try using this handy map to find out. Go back to the countywide races here or learn more about our guide below.


Suriano vacancy
Democratic primary:

Gerald Cleary

Name: Gerald V. Cleary (D)
Running for: 10th subcircuit: Suriano vacancy
Bio: Cleary was appointed to a 10th subcircuit judicial vacancy in December 2016 by the Illinois Supreme Court. He currently serves in the chancery division. Previously, he had been appointed to a circuit court vacancy and presided over misdemeanor and petty offense trials from November 2015 until December 2016. Before that he worked at various firms and “had extensive trial experience resolving complex civil and commercial disputes related to businesses, aviation carriers, health care providers and insurance companies,” according to his website. Cleary volunteers to hear cases as the flex call judge so those representing themselves (pro se litigants) can appear in court outside of work hours. He also volunteers as a judge at the Cook County expungement seminar. Cleary ran unsuccessfully for judge in 2008 and 2012.
Bar association ratings: Positive
This year: The CBA found Cleary highly qualified, and the ISBA and CCL found him qualified. The CCL wrote, “He was praised for being exceptionally knowledgeable, hard-working, and fair.”
Past: In 2012, Cleary was found highly qualified by the CBA and qualified by the CCL.
Survey response: Responding to an Injustice Watch survey, Cleary wrote, “A pressing issue facing the judiciary is the attack by the other branches of government and special interests groups on the independence and credibility of judges.” (Full survey)

Noreen P. Connolly

Name:  Noreen P. Connolly (D)
Running for: 10th subcircuit: Suriano vacancy
Bio: Connolly is assistant general counsel at Verizon Enterprise Services, supporting some of Verizon’s top customer relationships. Before joining Verizon in 2008, she worked at various firms and companies, including Accenture and the City of Chicago’s Law Department.
Bar association ratings: Negative
The CCL, the ISBA, and the CBA all rated Connolly not recommended because she did not participate in the evaluation process. Connolly did not respond to requests for comments on her ratings.
Survey response: The candidate did not return answers to an Injustice Watch questionnaire.

Colleen R. Daly

Name:  Colleen R. Daly (D)
Running for: 10th subcircuit: Suriano vacancy
Bio: Daly runs her own law firm where she represents clients in a variety of cases, including child protection, law enforcement administrative hearings, and criminal matters. She also represents children as a Guardian ad Litem. Previously, she served as a Cook County assistant state’s attorney for 13 years, where she worked in the criminal appeals division, juvenile division, felony review, grand jury, and felony trial divisions. Daly’s career has included representing police officers in administrative hearings, lawsuits, and criminal proceedings. She is also certified as a teacher. She volunteers as a pro bono lawyer for the Wills for Heroes program, drafting wills for first responders. Daly ran for judge unsuccessfully in 2016.
Bar association ratings: Positive
This year: The ISBA, CBA, and CCL all found Daly qualified. The CCL wrote, “She is described by opposing counsel as professional and diligent in following through on such items as discovery requests.”
Past: Daly was found qualified by the CCL and CBA during her 2016 run.
Notable: Daly represented William Pruente, a Chicago police officer convicted of perjury in a high-profile case. Daly has been endorsed by the Democratic party and the Chicago chapter of the Fraternal Order of Police. Her campaign has received a $1,000 donation from the Chicago Police Sergeants Association.
Survey Response: In her response to an Injustice Watch survey, Daly wrote she wants Cook County to expand the use of alternative disposition and court deferral programs in “juvenile delinquency matters, non-violent first offender matters, and substance abuse related offenses.” (Full survey)

Thomas Gabryszewski

Name: Thomas Gabryszewski (D)
Running for: 10th subcircuit: Suriano vacancy
Bio: Gabryszewski has practiced law for more than two decades, handling cases including automobile accidents, worker’s compensation, and misdemeanor defense. He currently runs a personal injury practice, which he has owned since 1997. Gabryszewski provides legal services in English and in Polish, and he does pro bono work with the Amicus Poloniae Volunteer Free Legal Clinic. Before becoming a lawyer, Gabryszewski served in the Marine Corps.
Bar association ratings: Mixed
The ISBA found Gabryszewski not qualified, writing, “He is considered to be prepared, pleasant and knowledgeable in his area. Concerns were raised, however, over his lack of experience with complex cases, and over his lack of recent jury trial experience.” The CBA also rated him not recommended. The CCL found him qualified, however, and wrote he “is praised for his knowledge of the law” and “does substantial pro bono representation work.”  Gabryszewski did not respond to requests for comment on his ratings.
Survey Response: The candidate did not return answers to an Injustice Watch questionnaire.

Jill Rose Quinn

Name: Jill Rose Quinn (D)
Running for: 10th subcircuit: Suriano vacancy
Bio: Quinn has worked in various general legal practices around the country and has had her own firm since 1997, which assists clients with financial challenges, family law, small business operations, probate, and estate planning. She has also worked for the village attorney in Glen Ellyn, Illinois, and as an arbitrator in DuPage and Cook counties. On her website, she writes, “Being transgender has taught Jill firsthand what it is like to be marginalized and the vital importance of treating all people with fairness, decency and compassion.”
Bar association ratings: Mixed
The ISBA and CBA found Quinn qualified, with the CBA citing her “knowledge of the law, legal ability, integrity, and outstanding demeanor and temperament.” The CCL, however, found Quinn not qualified because of a lack of experience in more complex legal areas. In response, Quinn told Injustice Watch, “I have a lot of litigation experience. I think it’s adequate for the job. And I think I have enough experience in other areas, such as running my own business and being in a lot of different areas of law.”
Notable: After Republican gubernatorial candidate Jeanne Ives aired an advertisement that many found offensive to transgender people, Quinn’s campaign created a video spoofing the Ives ad and refuting her message. Quinn is the first openly transgender political candidate in Illinois and, if elected, would be one of only three transgender judges in the country. Read the Injustice Watch story about Quinn’s candidacy here.
Survey Response: The candidate did not return answers to an Injustice Watch questionnaire.

Republican primary:

There are no Republican candidates running for this seat. 


O’Neill Burke vacancy
Democratic primary: 

Gwyn E. Ward Brown

Name: Gwyn E. Ward Brown (D)
Running for: 10th subcircuit: O’Neill Burke vacancy
Bio: Brown currently works on post-conviction matters and appeals in the Legal Resources Division of the Cook County Public Defender’s Office. She primarily works on potential wrongful conviction cases. Brown has been an assistant public defender for more than 26 years and has also handled civil appeals. Earlier in her career, she briefly worked as a solo practitioner in Milwaukee.
Bar association ratings: Mixed
The CBA and CCL rated Brown qualified; the CCL wrote that she “is knowledgeable about her area of law” and “is reported to be a mentor in her office of other lawyers.” The ISBA found Brown not qualified, writing, “While she is considered to be diligent and knowledgeable in her area, she has very limited jury trial experience, all dating from approximately twenty years ago.” Brown did not respond to requests for comment on her ratings.
Notable: Brown represented Alonzo Smith, a victim of police torture under disgraced former Chicago Police Commander Jon Burge, in his attempt to overturn his conviction; she eventually passed the case on to the People’s Law Office to work on Smith’s lawsuit against the city.
Survey Response: The candidate did not return answers to an Injustice Watch questionnaire.

Lorraine Murphy

Name: Lorraine Murphy (D)
Running for: 10th subcircuit: O’Neill Burke vacancy
Bio: Murphy has worked in the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office since 2003. Currently assigned to the felony trial division at the criminal courthouse, she has also worked in felony review, preliminary hearings, criminal appeals, and the Markham courthouse. She describes herself on her website as a “tireless of advocate of victims’ rights.” Before earning her law degree in 2003, she worked in journalism.
Bar association ratings: Mixed
The ISBA and CCL found her qualified; the CCL wrote, “She has substantial experience in complex litigation matters and is currently a lead prosecutor in a felony trial courtroom.” The CBA found her not recommended because she was a member of its evaluating committee when the evaluation process started, and according to its rules she therefore had to be found not recommended.
Notable: Murphy is endorsed by the Chicago chapter of the Fraternal Order of Police.
Survey Response: The candidate did not return answers to an Injustice Watch questionnaire.

Stephanie Saltouros

Name: Stephanie Saltouros (D)
Running for: 10th subcircuit: O’Neill Burke vacancy
Bio: Saltouros is currently a judge in Cook County; she was appointed to fill a vacancy in September 2016. She works in the domestic violence division hearing civil and criminal cases. Previously, she worked for 12 years in the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office, including in the domestic violence and felony review divisions, before starting her own practice where she worked for eight years.
Bar association ratings: Positive
The CCL found Saltouros qualified, writing, “Respondents praised her as a prosecutor, a criminal defense practitioner, and as a judge.” The CBA and ISBA also found her qualified.
Notable: Saltouros is endorsed by the Cook County Democratic Party. She previously ran for judge in the 10th subcircuit in 2016 and was slated by the Democratic Party, but withdrew from the race and endorsed Eve Marie Reilly, who had served on the bench after being appointed to a vacancy. “When it became apparent to me that my candidacy would not unite the party, I decided to take the action that I believe will be in the best interests of my community and for the judicial system,” she said at the time.
Survey Response: In her response to an Injustice Watch survey, Saltouros wrote that one of the biggest problems in the legal system is that many people cannot afford an attorney and try to represent themselves – especially on the civil side. She believes there should be more pro bono lawyers in the courthouses. (Full survey)

Republican primary:

There are no Republican candidates running for this seat. 


Injustice Watch has spent the past several months scouring the public record about the candidates. We’ve looked through everything from the candidates’ past employment to court records and campaign contributions. We’ve studied past disciplinary trouble, and we’ve collected the recommendations of the three major bar associations: the Chicago Bar Association (CBA), the Chicago Council of Lawyers (CCL) and the Illinois State Bar Association (ISBA). We also offered each candidate the opportunity to complete a survey offering information detailing their experience and reasons for running. (All survey responses have been uploaded online.)

That research has led us to publish several individual articles, as well as this guide to help voters go to the polls better informed. (As a news organization, we are not endorsing any candidates, merely gathering information to help voters judge for themselves.)

Candidates file for a specific race: The candidates declare which seat they seek, and some candidates end up with no opposition at all. With the exception of a few suburban subcircuit contests, winning the Democratic primary amounts to securing the judicial post, as most candidates will face no Republican opposition in the November general election.

The candidates are running to fill openings created on the bench by a judge’s retirement, resignation, or death. Several of the candidates were given temporary appointments by the Illinois Supreme Court to fill vacancies up through the election, but each of them must compete in the elections to win a full six-year term.